MEDIA

PHOTOS

MWCC THREE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY – MARCH 2014

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MWCC's MCV Shore Base in Ingleside, Texas houses modular processing facilities to outfit the company's modular capture vessels (MCVs) and the capping stacks, which are the centerpiece of the containment system.

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MWCC's SURF Shore Base in Theodore, Alabama houses the company's subsea umbilical, risers and flowlines (SURF) equipment.

CLEAN GULF CONFERENCE 2013 – NOVEMBER 2013

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The MWCC booth at Clean Gulf 2013, which highlighted the MCV and SURF shore base locations in Ingleside and Theodore.

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Kim Redmond and Mark Swann of MWCC interact with Coast Guard attendees at Clean Gulf 2013.

MWCC SINGLE RAM CAPPING STACK 350 DEGREE F RERATE - NOVEMBER 2013

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In November 2013, MWCC announced that its single ram capping stack - the centerpiece of its interim containment system - can handle temperatures up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

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MWCC's single ram capping stack - which stands about 30 ft. tall and weighs 100 tons - is industry's only capping stack capable of handling temperatures of 350 degrees Fahrenheit at pressures up to 15k psi.

MWCC MCV SHORE BASE SELECTION - JULY 2013

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Pictured left to right: Carmine Dulisse, MWCC HSE Officer; Astley Blair, MWCC CFO; Charlie Miller, MWCC CTO; Fuat Sezer, Kiewit Offshore Services President; Rep. J.M. Lozano, Texas House of Representatives; Judge Terry Simpson, San Patricio County Judge; Marty Massey, MWCC CEO; and Don Armijo, MWCC COO.

Guests at the MCV

Guests at the MCV Shore Base announcement event on July 23 took a bus tour to see where MWCC's MCV processing equipment will be stored, maintained and tested at Kiewit Offshore Services in Ingleside, Texas. MWCC will store the modular processing facilities for the MCVs and the centerpiece of the containment systems, the capping stacks, at this location.

MWCC 10K PSI Capping Stack Move - June 2013

10k psi capping stack

MWCC's new 10k psi capping stack - which stands 25 ft. tall including the necessary lifting gear and weighs approximately 50 tons - was loaded onto a truck for transportation from Trendsetter Engineering to the ASCO facility at the Houston ship channel.

10k psi capping stack

MWCC’s new 10k psi capping stack was transported to ASCO where it is currently stored and ready for use in the deepwater U.S. Gulf of Mexico. This capping stack has a footprint of 9 ft. by 9 ft. and allows for easier use in close well conductor spacings.

MWCC SURF SHORE BASE SELECTION - APRIL 2013

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Alabama Governor Robert Bentley presented MWCC CEO Marty Massey with Alabama state seal at an event announcing the selection of MWCC's SURF Shore Base in Mobile, Alabama.

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MWCC recently celebrated its SURF Shore Base announcement with an event in Theodore, Alabama. Guests included Alabama state and local government representatives, the U.S. Coast Guard and MWCC's partners, Technip USA and Core Industries.

Clean Gulf Conference 2012 - November 2012

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Attendees stopped by the MWCC booth at Clean Gulf 2012 in New Orleans. Also during the conference, MWCC CEO Marty Massey, General Counsel Rob Tracy and HSE Officer Carmine Dulisse presented in conference sessions.

MWCC Capping Stack Demonstration - July and August 2012

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The MWCC capping stack, which stands roughly 30 feet tall including the necessary lifting gear and weighs about 100 tons, was transported from the ASCO facility in Houston to the Greensport dock, roughly one mile away, for pre-deployment testing.

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MWCC Operations Superintendent Chip Ledbetter provided BSEE Director James Watson and BSEE Lead Inspector Kelly Bouzigard with an overview of the capping stack during pre-deployment testing at Greensport in Houston.

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The MWCC capping stack was prepared for pre-deployment testing at the Houston ship channel prior to deployment.

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The "Big John" crane, with lift capacity of 500 tons, was used to lift the MWCC capping stack onto the LANEY CHOUEST at the Houston ship channel.

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The MWCC capping stack was lowered onto a shipping stand on the LANEY CHOUEST before undergoing a simulated deployment and then sea fastening for departure offshore.

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After the MWCC capping stack was lowered onto the LANEY CHOUEST, a simulated deployment was performed, using the A-frame to lower the capping stack just above the water.

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The LANEY CHOUEST, transporting the MWCC capping stack, departed for the simulated well in the deepwater U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

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After arriving at the simulated well at Walker Ridge 536 in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Shell prepared the MWCC capping stack to be lowered to the simulated wellhead.

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The MWCC capping stack was launched off the LANEY CHOUEST using the A-frame and began its descent 6,900 ft. where it would be latched to the simulated wellhead.

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Buoys were used to hold the weight of MWCC's capping stack so that it would smoothly land, regardless of sea conditions.

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The MWCC capping stack approached the simulated wellhead approximately 6,900 ft. below the water's surface.

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The MWCC capping stack landed and latched on the simulated wellhead, approximately 6,900 feet below the water's surface. Pressure testing confirmed the capping stack’s ability to control a well.

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Once the simulated well was successfully shut in, the MWCC capping stack was prepared for retrieval. A spreader bar was attached and used to raise the capping stack back onto the LANEY CHOUEST.

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The MWCC capping stack was raised back onto the LANEY CHOUEST where it was sea fastened onto the shipping stand, and the vessel departed for Greensport.

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The MWCC capping stack was transported back to ASCO where it will be stored and maintained in a ready state should it ever be needed.

LMOGA Annual Meeting - January 2012

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Pictured left to right: Dan Smallwood, then MWCC COO, Chris John, LMOGA president, and Marty Massey, MWCC CEO, attended LMOGA's annual meeting where MWCC was honored with a Blue Heron Award.

Clean Gulf Conference 2011 - November 2011

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MWCC staff attended Clean Gulf Conference 2011 in San Antonio. It was the first time for the company to participate in Clean Gulf. In addition to the exhibit, then COO Dan Smallwood presented in the subsea containment session.

Aframax Tanker Naming Ceremony - September 2011

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Pictured left to right: Datuk Nasrudin Idris, Chairman of AET and President and CEO of MISC and his wife, Datin Roi Hanah, Marty Massey, MWCC CEO and his wife, Pam, and Hor Weng Yew, President and CEO of AET attended Aframax tanker naming ceremony in Japan.

MWCC Executives and Offices - April 2011

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MWCC officers, from left: CTO Charlie Miller; CFO Astley Blair; CEO Marty Massey; HSE officer Carmine Dulisse and then COO Dan Smallwood opened MWCC's headquarters with a symbolic ribbon-cutting ceremony.

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The MWCC management team oversaw final testing of the interim containment system capping stack. Pictured left to right are: Carmine Dulisse, HSE officer; Marty Massey, CEO; Astley Blair, CFO; Dan Smallwood, then COO; and Charles Miller, CTO.

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On March 15, 2011, G. Steven Farris, Apache Corporation chairman and chief executive officer (left), signed Marine Well Containment Company membership documents as MWCC Chief Executive Officer Marty Massey observed.

Secretary Ken Salazar's Visit to ASCO - April 2011

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Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and MWCC CEO, Marty Massey, viewed the company's interim containment system capping stack.

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Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and MWCC CEO, Marty Massey, viewed the company's interim containment system capping stack with industry and government officials.

Interim Containment System - February 2011

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The interim containment system subsea capping stack is about 30 feet tall including the necessary lifting gear, 14 feet wide and weighs 100 tons. It can operate in water depths up to 10,000 feet.

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The capping stack - the centerpiece of the interim containment system - is located in a port facility in Houston, ready for deployment.

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The MWCC interim containment system includes a subsea capping stack with the ability to shut in oil flow or flow the oil to surface vessels. The system provides containment capabilities in the event of a well control incident in the deepwater U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Hearing - September 2010

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The Marine Well Containment Company panel addressed the audience at a Bureau of Ocean Energy Management hearing. The series of BOEM forums included industry, academic and environmental experts, as well as public officials.

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Sara Ortwein, president, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, explained MWCC's goals and its progress to date, as part of a BOEM panel discussion in Lafayette, La.

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Representatives from ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell and ConocoPhillips provided updates on the MWCC as part of an ongoing dialogue with government officials.

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Charlie Williams, chief scientist, Shell Oil, explained plans to engineer, construct and develop equipment to improve capabilities to contain a potential future underwater blowout in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

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Melody Meyer, president, Chevron Energy Technology Company, discussed MWCC's role in a larger industry effort to ensure safe drilling operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

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Steve Bross, manager of product development, ConocoPhillips, detailed the enhanced capabilities of subsea and surface components in the new containment system.